Stations as Nodes: exploring the role of stations in future metropolitan areas from a French and Dutch perspective

  • Manuela Triggianese TU Delft, Architecture and the Built Environment
  • Roberto Cavallo TU Delft, Architecture and the Built Environment
  • Nacima Baron Université Paris-Est
  • Joran Kuijper TU Delft, Architecture and the Built Environment

Synopsis

At the main point of intersection between the railway and the city, stations are key elements in the organization of the intermodal transport as well as catalysts of urban developments in metropolises, medium and small cities. The focus of this publication is to explore the enrichment of a renewed approach of railway stations as intermodal nodes, therefore acting as breeding grounds for both urban and social developments.

This book has been initiated and built upon several activities currently running at the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions (AMS Institute), Delft University of Technology (DIMI, Delft Deltas Infrastructure Mobility Initiative and Department of Architecture of the Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment) and University of Paris-Est (l’École d’Urbanisme de Paris). These activities have been framed within the context of two rapidly developing metropolitan areas: Randstad in the Netherlands and Métropole du Grand Paris in the Ile de France. This volume forms the basis for a research on the ‘role of stations in future metropolitan areas’ with the ambition to link the two countries, learning from their different cities and distinct geographical context through comparable mobility challenges on the levels of the inner city, suburban and peripheral areas.

In line with these considerations, in 2018 AMS Institute, TU Delft/ DIMI and the Dutch Embassy in Paris with Atelier Néerlandais organized a successful workshop: ‘Stations of the Future’, in collaboration with La Fabrique de la Cité. Together with Dutch and French planning entities, involving mass transit operators and railway companies, this workshop focused on several case studies in both metropolitan areas to understand the role of station hubs as intermodal nodes. During this joint French-Dutch event that took place in Paris, we spoke on topics like Station as intermodal node, Station as destination and Station as data center, including a debate on the relation between public space and architecture, densification and programming of station areas, pedestrian flows management and the integration of data.

Following the Paris workshop, the summer school ‘Integrated Mobility Challenges in Future Metropolitan Areas’ was organised by AMS Institute and Delft University of Technology/DIMI with the collaboration of the ARENA architectural research network, University of Paris-Est and the City of Amsterdam. This 8-day workshop extended the debate among international young professionals, academics and master students by looking at an important rail-metro node in the metropolitan area of the city Amsterdam: Sloterdijk Station – a crucial hub in a bigger urban area for mobility and exchange, and for urban growth. The main question was: which approaches and scenarios can be tested and applied to these intermodal nodes, particularly when dealing with lack of space and growing number of users? The results were four very different plans to improve the Sloterdijk Station area and to make the station a ‘future proof’ intermodal hub.

In this publication, invited experts from practice and knowledge institutes in France and the Netherlands share their common experience and draw on specific aspects and problems of conception, management and development of stations. A brief overview of the results of the two initiatives ‘Stations of the Future’ and the summer school ‘Integrated Mobility Challenges in Future Metropolitan Areas’ is here illustrated, accompanied by photo reportages of both events and by a curated reportage of the Amsterdam Sloterdijk station area.

Author Biographies

Manuela Triggianese, TU Delft, Architecture and the Built Environment

Manuela coordinates the master program of the Chair of Complex Projects, at the Department of Architecture at the Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment. She develops research projects on stations with Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions and TU Delft Deltas Infrastructure Mobility Initiative. In 2015 she worked as visiting researcher at the Beijing Technical University and in 2014 she obtained the doctoral degree at the Faculty of Architecture in Venice (IUAV).

Roberto Cavallo, TU Delft, Architecture and the Built Environment

Roberto steers the research program at the Department of Architecture at the Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment. He is a member of the ARENA Research Network and editor of AJAR, Arena Journal of Architectural Research. In 2013 and 2014 he worked as senior researcher in China (Shanghai, Hong Kong, Beijing). His particular research interest is ‘Infrastructures and City’.

Nacima Baron, Université Paris-Est

Stations is a key part of Nacima’s academic activity at École des Ponts and Université Paris-Est as a Director of Chaire Gare, a five year partnership for teaching and investigation. She is responsible for the master track on Grand Paris Express station projects at École d’Urbanisme, second year engineers track ‘Station Conception and Planning’ at École des Ponts and since 2007 she is a full professor at the Université Paris-Est

Joran Kuijper, TU Delft, Architecture and the Built Environment

Joran is involved in research and education activities at the Department of Architecture at the Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment. Within the academic environment he has been member of several editorial teams, as for example in 2012 the international conference proceedings ‘New Urban Configurations’.

Cover for Stations as Nodes: exploring the role of stations in future metropolitan areas from a French and Dutch perspective

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ISBN-13 (15)
9789463661409
Date of first publication (11)
2018-12-01
Rights
Creative Commons License

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.